Compassion is not what you think it is – Part 2

Compassion is not what you think it is – Part 2
Hofman A Turing

This is the second part of an essay exploring compassion from the perspective of a member of The Satanic Temple (TST).

You can find Part 1 here, and for a primer on Buddhism, modern Satanism, and the LHP/RHP check out Part 1.5 here.

Part II

“Compassion has nothing to do with achievement at all. It is spacious and very generous. When a person develops real compassion, he is uncertain whether he is being generous to others or to himself because compassion is environmental generosity, without direction, without ‘for me’ and without ‘for them.’” – Chögyam Trungpa *

“We must take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented” – Elie Wiesel *

In the second part of this series we briefly explore Buddhist compassion, wisdom, will, and death.

In Part 1 I mentioned 20th century Tibetan master Chögyam Trungpa’s understanding that “true compassion has the potential to appear cruel or ruthless.*” To be clear, I am not suggesting that compassion cannot include acts of kindness. Nor am I promoting the idea that we should set out to be ruthless or cruel. Actual compassion requires a lot of maturity, skill, knowledge, and experience to know when it’s appropriate to go one way or the other.

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Compassion is not what you think it is – Part 1

This essay is the first in a series exploring compassion from the perspective of a member of The Satanic Temple (TST).

Compassion is not what you think it is – Part 1
Hofman A Turing

This essay is the first in a series exploring compassion from the perspective of a member of The Satanic Temple (TST). For those unfamiliar with TST it is highly recommended that you first read this brief FAQ.

PART I

“It is compassion rather than the principle of justice which can guard us against being unjust to our fellow men.” – Bruce Lee

“Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves. – Carl Jung

Compassion is a ubiquitous word. As with many words it is like a subjectively interpreted ink blotter test. It is commonly assumed that we all know what it means, and that this meaning is shared with whomever we are communicating. Yet, we talk past each other all the time without realizing it, and more acutely when certain words are in the mix, such as compassion. It would be standard practice for me to offer a definition at this point, but for now I’m allowing the Rorschach dynamic to remain in play. I will offer a definition shortly.

Continue reading “Compassion is not what you think it is – Part 1”

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